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Farhana Qazi

Farhana Qazi on Talk Border

Michael Cutler
Senior Immigration Editor And Senior Special Agent Of The Ins (ret)

Farhana, an expert on Islam, provides her perspectives on radical Islamist terror attacks



14 year old girl shot in Pakistan by Taliban and more

Farhana Qazi

Farhana visiting students at a madrassa in Quetta, Pakistan. | Photo: FarhanaQazi.com | Farhana Qazi, Cia, Pakistan, Analyst, Author, Lecturer,

14 year old girl shot in Pakistan by Taliban and more

Michael Cutler
Senior Immigration Editor And Senior Special Agent Of The Ins (ret)

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[Comments] Several months ago Farhana Qazi sat down with me for an interview at TalkBorder.com and shared her unique perspectives as an expert on Islam and the issue of terrorism linked to radical Islam.

Her background provides her with a vantage point few can match.

Farhana is a Texan-Punjabi-Muslim American woman.

As an American and a Muslim, she is able to straddle the seemingly contradictory worlds of East and West. In her quest for knowledge, traveling to places off-the-beaten-path to understand how communities are brutally affected by violence.
For over a decade, she has been helping people rethink assumptions and assertions about women in war. Trying to answer the oft-repeated question "Why do women kill or protest?" requires an understanding of culture, religion, history, and men. After all, women rarely act alone. Nor do Muslim women kill or protest out-of-context.

She is a graduate of The George Washington University, where she studied political violence and the ideological roots of terrorism. There are important distinctions between them. Thus, no two conflicts in the Islamic world are alike.

On October 24, 2012 she returned for a follow-up conversation on a number of recent acts of extreme violence carried out in Pakistan and Libya.

On October 9, 2012, fourteen year old student Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head as she sat on her school bus. Other classmates were also shot and wounded. The perpetrators have been determined to be members of the Taliban. They specifically sought Malala out in an effort to silence her young but very influential voice- a voice that has repeatedly spoken out against terror related violence and spoken for the education of women.

On September 11, 2012 the United States Embassy at Benghazi, Libya was attacked by terrorists. The U.S. Ambassador and three other State Department officials were killed. Controversy surrounds the apparent reluctance of the Obama administration to disclose that the attack was a terrorist attack and not simply a spontaneous demonstration that got out of control.

It may be easy for some to dismiss an attack on an American embassy, as horrible as that attack was, as something that lacks immediacy where the security of the United States is concerned. In point of fact, the attacks of September 11, 2001 were preceded by the attack of two U.S. Embassies and an attack on the USS Cole, a United States Navy warship.

While the demise of Osama bin Laden at the hands of American commandos struck a blow against al-Qaeda, in point of fact that terrorist organization and others are able to propel other members into leadership positions. Simply stated, the "All-Clear" has not sounded is not likely to sound for years or, perhaps, decades to come.

Failures to secure the borders of the United States and failures to effectively enforce America's immigration laws, fly in the face of the findings of the 9/11 Commission. The lessons that should have been learned in the aftermath of the attacks of 9/11have not been taken to heart. The immigration laws have two primary objectives: to protect American lives and protect American jobs.

Efforts to provide security for the United States and its citizens must take immigration-related issues into account and be incorporated into coordinated strategies to address national security in an effective manner.



About Farhana
An Insider from Multiple Perspectives: I am a Texan-Punjabi-Muslim American woman. Because of my diverse background, I am an American who strives to impart truth and understanding about the dynamics of terrorism, Muslims in America, and women in war.

As an American and a Muslim, I am able to straddle the seemingly contradictory worlds of East and West. In my quest for knowledge, I travel to places off-the-beaten-path to understand how communities are brutally affected by violence. In particular, the ever-popular and often-invisible stories of women in war fuel my passion for writing'and reporting from Kashmir, Pakistan, and Iraq.

For over a decade, I have been helping people rethink assumptions and assertions about women in war. Trying to answer the oft-repeated question "Why do women kill or protest?" requires an understanding of culture, religion, history, and men. After all, women rarely act alone. Nor do Muslim women kill or protest out-of-context.

I am a graduate of The George Washington University, where I studied political violence and the ideological roots of terrorism. There are important distinctions between them. Thus, no two conflicts in the Islamic world are alike. I hope my research on the social and psychological dimensions of war will inform the international community.


Michael Cutler

Michael Cutler, Senior Immigration Editor And Senior Special Agent Of The Ins (ret): I think it is absolutely essential that I explain who I am. I also feel it is important to explain why I have embarked upon a mission to provide insight about our nation's many failures in securing the United States borders. My opinions are based on thirty years of experience with the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). Beyond my professional experience, I'd also like you to understand that who I am as a human being is a foundation for my opinions as well. Why is immigration... (more...)