The Right

No Justice No Peace

Ferguson unrest
Ferguson unrest
An ongoing series of protests and civil disorder began the day after the fatal shooting of Michael Brown on August 9, 2014, in Ferguson, Missouri. As the details of the original shooting event emerged from investigators, police established curfews and deployed riot squads to maintain order. There was looting and violent unrest in the vicinity. | Photo: Archives | Ferguson, Missouri, Unrest, Riot, Violence, Mask, Michael Brown, Smoke, Crime,

Why riot for a criminal?

After a careful review of multitudes of evidence, the Grand Jury chose not to indict Ferguson Police Officer Darren Williams on murder charges for the shooting of Michael Brown.

Riots and looting began immediately following the prosecutor's announcement. By the next morning, at least 25 businesses had been burned, 61 people arrested, numerous businesses looted, and countless windows broken throughout Ferguson and the surrounding area.

Darren Wilson's side of the story has finally been released. According to Wilson's account, he was leaving a call when he came upon Michael Brown and his accomplice, Dorian Johnson, walking down the middle of the street. Cars were maneuvering around them. They were obviously a road hazard, so Wilson told them to walk on the sidewalk. Next thing he knew, he was trapped in his car, being assaulted by Michael Brown, fearing for his life.

As much as Michael Brown's parents, the protesters, and the activists may want to believe that Officer Wilson is some racist cracker pig who just felt like gunning down an unarmed black kid, that isn't what happened. The physical evidence backed up Darren Wilson's account of events. The "witnesses" who claimed to have seen Darren Wilson murder Michael Brown changed their stories. There was no case.
There is a cardinal rule in life that applies to people of all skin colors: if you assault a police officer, be prepared to get shot. God only knows why Michael Brown did what he did that day, but his death was the result of his own actions, and most definitely was not the result of a racist cop.

How would it have benefited anyone to have Darren Wilson brought up on charges? None of the evidence supported allegations that Officer Wilson had murdered Michael Brown in cold blood. Despite the image put out by Michael Brown's family and perpetuated by the media, he was not the "gentle giant" they made him out to be. On his way home from robbing a convenience store, he assaulted a police officer, and he paid the price for his own actions. He was not giving Darren Wilson an overly aggressive hug, he was trying to kill him. Regrettable as Michael Brown's death may be, the person ultimately responsible for Michael Brown's death was Michael Brown. Putting Darren Wilson on trial would have only stretched out the unrest for even longer.

Michael Brown was a punk kid who robbed a convenience store, attacked a police officer, and was shot and killed because he apparently didn't have the sense to understand that law enforcement officers are perfectly justified in using lethal force to defend their own lives. Is this really worth the destruction that has followed his death? How exactly does burning buildings, destroying shops, attacking police, or even marching in the streets to protest the death of a kid who attacked a police officer moments after committing robbery further anyone's cause?

Ferguson unrest
Ferguson unrest

An ongoing series of protests and civil disorder began the day after the fatal shooting of Michael Brown on August 9, 2014, in Ferguson, Missouri. As the details of the original shooting event emerged from investigators, police established curfews and deployed riot squads to maintain order. There was looting and violent unrest in the vicinity. | Ferguson, Missouri, Unrest, Riot, Violence, Mask, Michael Brown, Smoke, Crime,

The race baiters have been out in force since the August shooting. Always they question the 'whiteness' of the Ferguson Police Department. And yet, as evidenced by recent events, the black community in Ferguson has been conditioned to irrational distrust of law enforcement. The night of the announcement of the Grand Jury's verdict, I saw video of black police officers being berated by the mob for being on the police force. In a self-segregated community that celebrates criminal gangsters and perpetuates its own anti-police biases, how could anyone possibly hold a reasonable expectation that this community would have proportional representation on the police force? The entire argument is a straw-man designed to ignore the real issues plaguing the black community, and makes it virtually impossible to have an honest discussion about race relations in the United States.

I'm hoping that in the coming days, we see mass arrests of the looters and rioters. Unrest over the verdict seems to be spreading to major cities across America, and even white cop Barney Fife would be able to see that it's time to "nip it in the bud."

Furthermore, Michael Brown's stepfather should be facing jail time. No matter how upset he may have been over his stepson's death and the announcement that there would be no indictment, inciting a riot is still a crime.

Race relations in the United States may not be on the best footing right now, but I can guarantee you this: everyone's relations with everyone else will go a lot more smoothly if people would just take responsibility for their own actions, and stop blaming everyone else.

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Updated May 6, 2017 5:51 AM EDT | More details

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