AND Magazine Menu

Internet Slang 4 Parents

Aaron Stipkovich
Publisher

Think TMI covers it? Think again.



On the cover:

28 internet acronyms parents need to know

Education

Education in its general sense is a form of learning in which the knowledge, skills, and habits of a group of people are transferred from one generation to the next through teaching, training, or research. Education frequently takes place under the guidance of others, but may also be autodidactic. | Photo: | Education, School, Student, Child, Learn, Books, Classroom,

28 internet acronyms parents need to know

135.1K

Views/Shares

[Comments] Moms and dads, your kids are speaking a whole new language online, and if you can't crack the code, it could mean big trouble.

Sure, most of you know what LOL means (right?), but what about "IWSN" and "GNOC"?

Those two terms mean "I want sex now" and "get naked on camera," and they are just two of CNN's 28 internet slang terms you need to know.

Many of the acronyms are used to hide sexting or drug use from you. Other's warn their texting partner when you're watching, and not watching over your child's shoulder.

So "LMK" -- let me know -- and "WYCM" -- will you call me? -- are innocent enough.

But the issue, especially for parents, is understanding the slang that could signal some dangerous teen behavior, such as "GNOC,'" which means "get naked on camera."

And it certainly helps for a parent to know that "PIR" means parent in room, which could mean the teen wants to have a conversation about things that his or her mom and dad might not approve of.

Katie Greer is a national Internet safety expert who has provided Internet and technology safety training to schools, law enforcement agencies and community organizations throughout the country for more than seven years.

She says research shows that a majority of teens believe that their parents are starting to keep tabs on their online and social media lives.

"With that, acronyms can be used by kids to hide certain parts of their conversations from attentive parents," Greer said. "Acronyms used for this purpose could potentially raise some red flags for parents."

But parents would drive themselves crazy, she said, if they tried to decode every text, email and post they see their teen sending or receiving.

"I've seen some before and it's like 'The Da Vinci Code,' where only the kids hold the true meanings (and most of the time they're fairly innocuous)," she said.

Still, if parents come across any acronyms they believe could be problematic, they should talk with their kids about them, said Greer.


Sandra Bullock in The Net

The Net is a 1995 cyber thriller film featuring Sandra Bullock. With an estimated budget of $22 million and a release date of 28 July 1995, The Net earned $50,727,965 in domestic box office. Including foreign markets, the film grossed $110,627,965 worldwide, and an additional $23,771,600 in US rentals as of January 2012. | Photo: The Net | Sandra Bullock, The Net, Actress, Internet, Privacy, Identity,

Here's the full list:

  1. IWSN - I want sex now
  2. GNOC - Get naked on camera
  3. NIFOC - Naked in front of computer
  4. PIR - Parent in room
  5. CU46 - See you for sex
  6. 53X - Sex
  7. 9 - Parent watching
  8. 99 - Parent gone
  9. 1174' - Party meeting place
  10. THOT - That hoe over there
  11. CID - Acid (the drug)
  12. Broken - Hungover from alcohol
  13. 420 - Marijuana
  14. POS - Parent over shoulder
  15. SUGARPIC - Suggestive or erotic photo
  16. KOTL - Kiss on the lips
  17. (L)MIRL - Let's meet in real life
  18. PRON - Porn
  19. TDTM - Talk dirty to me
  20. 8 - Oral sex
  21. CD9 - Parents around/Code 9
  22. IPN - I'm posting naked
  23. LH6 - Let's have sex
  24. WTTP - Want to trade pictures?
  25. DOC - Drug of choice
  26. TWD - Texting while driving
  27. GYPO - Get your pants off
  28. KPC- Keeping parents clueless


Aaron Stipkovich

Aaron Stipkovich, Publisher: With an education in information, technology, business and related disciplines, Aaron entered business on radio. Beginning as a disc jockey in Southern California, a nationally syndicated talk show host position soon followed. During the transition from regional to national, he launched a national print magazine in several countries, and was distributed by Time Inc. Having a handful of humble business media entities, a decade or so later he has divested himself from most of his companies... (more...)