The Independent

a Woman President?

Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton
Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton, born October 26, 1947, a US Presidential candidate for 2016, former First Lady of the United States, United States Secretary of State, serving under President Barack Obama from 2009 to 2013; a former United States Senator from New York, and more. | Hillary Clinton, First Lady, President, Bill Clinton, Secretary Of State, Yale, Democrat, Flag,

Would a woman get caught up in the White House decor?

It’s time for Americans to consider a woman president. If we can send a robot lander to Mars, we can have a woman in the White House. There are considerations.

In general, I think women are a little more honest than men because they care less about strutting, arrogant false pride turning-itself-into-close-minded-dogma that for example, many of the current male presidential candidates exhibit.

Of course, a down side is that once a woman is elected, she often tries to act more like a man, to compete with the men around her, which is to act more arrogant, stupid and paranoid.

But some countries have been at their absolute peak when they’ve had a woman at the helm, the England of Elizabeth the First for example.

Women as a rule are good at multi-tasking, a key job skill for president, while men are like hound dogs, sniffing in just one direction after a goal until it becomes an obsession. Women are better than men at dealing with defeat or disappointment. They have a more user-friendly Murphy’s Law view of existence (a belief that setbacks are bound to occur), and are less likely to take a defeat as a personal loss of face, and thus shape twisted policies from it (Lyndon Johnson said he wasn’t going to let a “piss-ant country” (Vietnam) boss him around).

But there are possible problems.

A woman president might get too caught up in the décor of the White House, the curtains, the drapes and furniture, spend too much time shopping for interior decoration, neglecting foreign policy and the economy.

Naturally, the first woman president’s husband, the first First Man, might also have a tough time, being perceived in the public eye as a wimp, woos, pansy. Or, just as likely, he could be faulted as the real power behind the throne, as Hillary Clinton was when Bill was president.

Another unpleasant reality is that the populace is bound to be more harshly critical of a woman who makes a gaff as president, rather than chalking it up to simple innocent stupidity as they would with a man—-like when Nixon once walked into a wall on-camera, or when Gerald Ford beaned a spectator with a golf ball, or Jimmy Carter admitted he’d lusted after photos in Playboy Magazine.

Such conduct would be considered unladylike.

We have women in combat, but we still expect them to act like ladies.

It is a proven fact that women think with a different part of their brain.

Would a woman treat a dictator of a rogue state like an errant schoolboy instead of launching an invasion of his country? Women have shown they can be tough. To use a wrestling parlance, which Donald Trump will understand because Donald copies TV wrestling interviews to shape his image, Maggie Thatcher (British Prime Minister) once jumped off the “top turnbuckle” onto the neck of Argentina over the Falklands.

Whoever she is, the first woman president is bound to be a Democrat. That’s a con right there, because she will be in effect a member of no organized party. The right, which despite their denials still believe a woman should be barefoot and pregnant in the kitchen, (Republican candidates usually appoint a woman under them in a key post as a token to skirt the issue), would subject her to merciless attacks.

I think if you’re a man, the best reason to support a woman for president is—–take a look at the positive qualities of your own wife.

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Updated Aug 12, 2017 12:01 PM EDT | More details

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