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A Russian helping in Libya

Patrick Halliday
Contributor

Without any real western leadership in prime-time positions, american journalists have cried out in the wilderness: Russia!



On the cover:

Mikhail Fradkov
Mikhail Yefimovich Fradkov, born September 1, 1950, is a Russian politician and statesman who was the Prime Minister of Russia from March 2004 to September 2007. Fradkov has been the head of Russia's Foreign Intelligence Service since 2007.

Russia negotiates from strength

Nicholas I

Nicholas I (6 July (O.S. 25 June) 1796 – 2 March (O.S. 18 February) 1855) was the Emperor of Russia from 1825 until 1855. He was also the King of Poland and Grand Duke of Finland. He is best known as a political conservative whose reign was marked by geographical expansion, repression of dissent, economic stagnation, poor administrative policies, a corrupt bureaucracy, and frequent wars that culminated in Russia's disastrous defeat in the Crimean War of 1853-56. | Nicholas I, The Emperor Of Russia, The Decembrists, The Crimean War,

Russia negotiates from strength

Patrick Halliday
Contributor

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[Comments] Without any real Western leadership in prime-time positions, American journalists have cried out in the wilderness: Russia!

It is hard to imagine that Russia, with only one proper 30 year-old Aircraft Carrier, the whipping post of Europe, would or could come sauntering into Libya to help consolidate oil ramblings just as OPEC valuations meet an American escalation of active oil wells this week for an oil flatline despite the International Energy Agency's optimistic outlook.

Popular European Council President, Donald Tusk, just identified Trump, China and, of course, Russia as the major existential threats facing Europe.

German elections are about to occur and Russia has already been characterized as a major potential antagonist to the leading country in Europe that just took on well over a Million Arabians to feed its dwindling demographic in the age of Global Warming.

While wars have been fought over sanctions, it would be particularly strange to see Russia, a Nuclear power and Permanent Member of the Security Council, sanctioned into doing Europe's bidding and cleaning up a Libyan situation that it bleeding migrants at a pace to challenge Europe's own upper-limit quotas.

Still, perhaps sanguine and patient and righteous Russia can negotiate a peace such as the recent middling success in Astana over the Syrian War that did yield some results.

E.U. Foreign Minister Frederica Mogherini admitted to talking to her Russian counterpart, Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, in a phone call over a week ago and claimed the Two would be meeting in the coming weeks: perhaps even during the Munich Security Conference in mid February. They spoke of Syria and Libya. (Both ISIS situations to borrow a failed American moniker)

Italian Foreign Minister Angelino Alfano also recently spoke with the Russia foreign affairs head according to CNN and Tass, citing La Stampa. Paulo Gentiloni's Italy has sifted to the foreground in vocal anti-sanctions positions in the last half-year, blocking further sanctions over the liberating of Allepo, and coming out against a Polish proposal to renew sanctions for a year rather than 6 months.

Russia is currently in negotiations with multiple Libyan parties: the failing GNA based in Tripoli and Tobruk's General Khalifa Haftar. The General National Assembly has been vying for "official" control with the Islamist General National Congress (also in Tripoli) as Haftar as leader of the Libyan National Army has consolidated much of the Libya's oil and Libya's East. (Including Benghazi)

Russia's Foreign Ministry spokesman, Maria Zakharova, underlined over a week ago that negotiations, not force, would bring the multitude of forces fighting in Libya to accord.

While wars have fought over sanctions, it would be particularly strange to see Russia, a Nuclear power and Permanent Member of the Security Council, sanctioned into doing Europe's bidding and cleaning up a Libyan situation that it bleeding migrants at a pace to challenge Europe's own upper-limit quotas.

Still, perhaps sanguine and patient and righteous Russia can negotiate a peace such as the recent middling success in Astana with Iran and Turkey over the Syrian War that did yield some results?

E.U. Foreign Minister Frederica Mogherini admitted to talking to her Russian counterpart, Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, in a phone call over a week ago and claimed the Two would be meeting in the coming weeks: perhaps even during the Munich Security Conference. They spoke of Syria and Libya. (Both ISIS situations to borrow a failed American moniker)

Italian Foreign Minister Angelino Alfano also recently spoke with the Russia foreign affairs head according to CNN and Tass, citing La Stampa.

Paulo Gentiloni's Italy has sifted to the foreground in vocal anti-sanctions positions in the last half-year, and Russia is currently in negotiations with multiple Libyan parties: the failing GNA based in Tripoli and Tobruk's own General Khalifa Haftar. The General National Assembly is vying for "official" control with the Islamist General National Congress (also in Tripoli) as Haftar as leader of the Libyan National Army has consolidated much of the Libya's oil and Libya's East. (Including Benghazi)

Russia's Foreign Ministry spokesman, Maria Zakharova, underlined over a week ago that negotiations, not force, would bring the multitude of forces fighting in Libya to accord.


Patrick Halliday

Patrick Halliday, Contributor: I'm a '02 Brown University undergraduate in Religious Studies with a serious background in theater and fiction. I've covered economics, revolutions and Foreign Policy in that order. I got my start at the Warsaw Business Journal and then published in N.Y.C. on the Okkupy movement and above Zuccotti Park for the Christian Post, while working a community beat for the Greenpoint Gazette. At the time, I was lucky enough to be holed up in Tribeca as a Hollywood Ghostwriter. I am still blessed to... (more...)